News

12th June, 2014

The Supreme Court considers religious belief

The Supreme Court this morning delivered its judgment in Khaira v Shergill [2014] UKSC 33 in which it addressed, amongst other things, the extent to which it is permissible for courts to adjudicate on the truths of religious beliefs or on the validity of particular rites, as opposed to disputes over the ownership, possession and control of property held on trusts for religious purposes.

Mark Hill QC, who acted for the Respondents in the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal, will conduct a breakfast briefing on Wednesday 18 June 2014 at 8.00 am examining the reasoning of the Supreme Court and exploring the effect of the judgment for future cases concerning disputes within religious organisations.



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